28May Monday, May 28, 2012

1 Pet 1:3-9. Peter praises the saving mercy of God, on the occasion of a baptism.

Mk 10:17-27: Jesus calls on the rich young man to give his money away..

Losing to Gain

The paradox of voluntarily losing something in order to gain something else has a number of practical applications outside the religious sphere. The gambler knows that she or he stands to lose the wagered amount – but risks it just the same, in hope of the prize to be won, whether on the card-table, the racetrack or the stock-market. The farmer knows what must first be spent on seed, grain and fertilizer, in order to ensure a crop. And how many physicians urge their patients to lose some weight, in pursuit of a healthier lifestyle.

This imperative is echoed in today’s austere Gospel message, where in a deft, memorable image Jesus expresses the no pain, no gain philosophy. “It is easier for a camel to pass through a needle’s eye than for a rich person to enter the kingdom of God.” The anonymous rich young man was ready for other aspects of discipleship, perhaps: the learning, the travelling, the companionship – but not this stark call to renunciation. The riches and talents of life can block and stultify us unless they are enjoyed in accordance with God’s will and in a spirit of service and of sharing with our neighbour. That other haunting statement of Jesus comes back to mind: “Whoever loses his life will save it” (Mark 8:35).

While the first Epistle of Peter is one of the most optimistic documents in the New Testament, it too contains a hint of the same principle. Peter writes about how glory of the Risen Jesus transforms us from within, we who have been reborn by baptism into an imperishable inheritance. It looks as if First Peter began as a baptismal homily, possibly in Rome, when coming to enter the outlawed society which was the early church carried with it the risk of martyrdom. This element of risk to one’s life and freedom lends special quality to what Peter says about the grace of baptism. Through it we begin a new life, the glorious life of Jesus, a source of extraordinary joy and strength now, a pledge of what is “to be revealed in the last days.”

First Reading: 1 Peter 1:3-9

Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ! By his great mercy he has given us a new birth into a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead, and into an inheritance that is imperishable, undefiled, and unfading, kept in heaven for you, who are being protected by the power of God through faith for a salvation ready to be revealed in the last time. In this you rejoice, even if now for a little while you have had to suffer various trials, so that the genuineness of your faith – being more precious than gold that, though perishable, is tested by fire – may be found to result in praise and glory and honour when Jesus Christ is revealed. Although you have not seen him, you love him; and even though you do not see him now, you believe in him and rejoice with an indescribable and glorious joy, for you are receiving the outcome of your faith, the salvation of your souls.

Gospel:Mark 10:17-27

As he was setting out on a journey, a man ran up and knelt before him, and asked him, “Good Teacher, what must I do to inherit eternal life?” Jesus said to him, “Why do you call me good? No one is good but God alone. You know the commandments: ‘You shall not murder; You shall not commit adultery; You shall not steal; You shall not bear false witness; You shall not defraud; Honour your father and mother.'” He said to him, “Teacher, I have kept all these since my youth.” Jesus, looking at him, loved him and said, “You lack one thing; go, sell what you own, and give the money to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven; then come, follow me.” When he heard this, he was shocked and went away grieving, for he had many possessions.

Then Jesus looked around and said to his disciples, “How hard it will be for those who have wealth to enter the kingdom of God!” And the disciples were perplexed at these words. But Jesus said to them again, “Children, how hard it is to enter the kingdom of God! It is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for someone who is rich to enter the kingdom of God.” They were greatly astounded and said to one another, “Then who can be saved?” Jesus looked at them and said, “For mortals it is impossible, but not for God; for God all things are possible.”