10Aug We are all of equal and infinite value: Dr. Rosemary McHugh

“The really good news for me in the Gospel and the Eucharist is that we are all indeed, and in every moment, of equal and infinite value – even though the church’s aristocratic leadership culture still blithely denies that principle.”

Thankyou for this excellent article, especially the above quote. As a cradle Catholic, I would like to hear more from our church leaders about the fact that “we are all indeed, and in every moment, of equal and infinite value” to God, our Creator.

As a lay woman and as a physician, I have lived in the world my whole life, and it saddens me to hear the Pope denouncing the world, and harping on the secularization and materialism of the world.

I am uplifted by the spirituality of St Ignatius of Loyola. As a layman, Ignatius developed the Spiritual Exercises and the Rules of Discernment. In his spirituality, Ignatius stressed that we can find God in all things.

Rather than fearing the world, condemning the world, or running from it, the world is where God is to be found. Jesus always lived in the world when he was on earth.

I believe that mandatory celibacy in the Roman Catholic Church must end. Celibacy needs to be optional.

Human sexuality is good. It has become dysfunctional in the Roman Catholic Church to the point that many of the celibate leaders, including the Pope, lack any real understanding of real women and their reproductive needs.

Many of these childless celibate men also lack the normal human care that a good Dad would have in protecting the innocence of children.

I believe that an end to mandatory celibacy will help to bring these celibate men out of their bubble, and help them to come down to earth, and to living in the real world with the rest of us. It is time for them to get to really know women, the other half of the human race, and finally be responsible for children.

I believe that the New Evangelization will be more successful if clergy become one of us and live more integrated and balanced lives, for God’s greater glory.

Sincerely, Dr Rosemary Eileen McHugh, Chicago, Illinois, USA

“The really good news for me in the Gospel and the Eucharist is that we are all indeed, and in every moment, of equal and infinite value – even though the church’s aristocratic leadership culture still blithely denies that principle.”

Thankyou for this excellent article, especially the above quote.  As a cradle Catholic, I would like to hear more from our church leaders about the fact that “we are all indeed, and in every moment, of equal and infinite value” to God, our Creator. 

As a lay woman and as a physician, I have lived in the world my whole life, and it saddens me to hear the Pope denouncing the world, and harping on the secularization and materialism of the world.

I am uplifted by the spirituality of St Ignatius of Loyola.  As a layman, Ignatius developed the Spiritual Exercises and the Rules of Discernment.  In his spirituality, Ignatius stressed that we can find God in all things. 

Rather than fearing the world, condemning the world, or running from it, the world is where God is to be found.  Jesus always lived in the world when he was on earth.

I believe that mandatory celibacy in the Roman Catholic Church must end.  Celibacy needs to be optional. 

Human sexuality is good.  It has become dysfunctional in the Roman Catholic Church to the point that many of the celibate leaders, including the Pope, lack any real understanding of real women and  their reproductive needs. 

Many of these childless celibate men also lack the normal human care that a good Dad would have in protecting the innocence of children.

I believe that an end to mandatory celibacy will help to bring these celibate men out of their bubble, and help them to come down to earth, and to living in the real world with the rest of us.  It is time for them to get to really know women, the other half of the human race, and finally be responsible for children.

I believe that the New Evangelization will be more successful if clergy become one of us and live more integrated and balanced lives, for God’s greater glory.

Sincerely,   Dr Rosemary Eileen McHugh, Chicago, Illinois, USA
mchughrosemary@gmail.com
Dr Rosemary Eileen McHugh

3 Responses

  1. Fergus P Egan

    Ah! Jesus came down to earth and dwelt amongst us.
    Now if only his vicar on earth, et al, could do likewise.

    Fergus P Egan

  2. Chris McDonnell

    Dr Rosemary McHugh’s comment is to be applauded. Thank you for publishing it. The text below is the Mission Statement for the Movement for Married Clergy in UK.
    I would hope that there are many who would support the principles that underlie this text:
    Chris McDonnell Secretary Movement for Married Clergy UK

    The Movement for Married Clergy
    Choice

    1.Historically, only since the mid 12th Century has the church of the Roman Latin Rite required the discipline of celibacy of those men wishing to take major Orders. In 1139, the Second Lateran Council officially imposed mandatory celibacy on all priests and it has remained a Discipline within the Western Church ever since.

    2.The Movement for Married Clergy came into being in 1975, not to challenge the Church on matters of faith and doctrine but to question the continuing necessity of this discipline. Members of this Movement remain committed to the Roman Catholic Church as their home.

    3.We do not seek to say that all priests should be married but that the element of choice remain with the person who is offering himself for formation and eventual ordination.

    4.We do not see the Sacrament of Marriage conflicting in any way with the ministry of the priest. In fact, we believe that family life might enhance priesthood and ministry and offer a fine example to the Christian Community which he serves.

    5.We now have the experience of a number of individual Anglicans, who were married in their Anglican ministry, being received into the Church and later ordained, their ministry continuing as married priests. Their ministry has been welcomed by our people.

    6.More recently we have seen the establishment of the Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham which has once again highlighted in a very public manner the anomalies permitted in this discipline of the church. It is most unwise for any organisation to have its rules applied inconsistently.

    7.Over the years, many good priests, highly valued by their congregations, have had to resign in order to marry. This has been a great loss to the Church, which, it should be noted, teaches that marriage is an inalienable human right. It is fully acknowledged that in former centuries and in Eastern Rites today, marriage was and is only permitted prior to receiving Holy Orders. However, we feel that in natural justice and in Christian charity, those men who have left to marry could be invited to return to active ministry.

    8.Now, with the age profile of those priests currently serving parish communities rising at an alarming rate, Diocesan Authorities are looking to the amalgamation of parishes to be served by one priest, adding greatly to his personal load, as a solution to the problem. We feel that the introduction of ordination for married men would provide a happier way forward.

    9.We therefore continue to ask that the Western Church should consider the relaxation of the discipline of celibacy in order that we might meet the needs of the Church in our time. The Eucharist is at the heart of the Christian Mission, and we ask that those called to this sacred ministry, should have the choice of living either a married or celibate life. Vocation to priesthood, the answering of a call to Ministry need not be associated with an altogether separate calling to the celibate life. The time has come to revoke a discipline that has become a hindrance to vocation and a service to the Church rather than maintain it in radically changed circumstances.

    o-o

  3. Kevin

    “Ah! Jesus came down to earth and dwelt amongst us.
    Now if only his vicar on earth, et al, could do likewise.
    Fergus P Egan”

    Nice one !! lol


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