18May ‘The Catholic Church has at most 10 years to adapt’

<p>Writing in the Irish Times Mark Patrick Hederman suggests that there is little time left for the Catholic Church in Ireland to adapt to the realities of life as it is now lived before being reduced to a tiny irrelevant minority.</p>

http://www.irishtimes.com/culture/books/the-catholic-church-has-at-most-10-years-to-adapt-1.3084834

 

 

5 Responses

  1. Lloyd Allan MacPherson

    Nice article. The Pope inverted the pyramid to provide a work-around for the Revised Code of Canon Law. I saw this as him handing over the keys to the Church for a time, so that ideas could bubble to the surface. The problem now is that without a “governing body” accepting proposals and a format developed for this, silence and bewilderment could potentially be in the forefront during the most important time in our lives.

    Building bridges is a very important responsibility; this is what the Pope wants and here is how it is delivered to the end user. This algorithm is out there. There is a huge possibility to span the divide between today and tomorrow and an ever materializing opportunity to do so. It reappears daily.

    I’ll ask again: where is this Church of the inverted pyramid we’ve been promised? Are there any takers out there because there are those who have a great deal to give to this Church.

    A great thanks to Fr. Hederman for the Nova Scotia shout-out – ;).

  2. Anne

    Thank You Fr.Hederman for that refreshing article. I listened to an interview you gave on the radio recently also and I thought if only there were more people like you in the Church.
    I read somewhere once that some cultures recognise that in the human family there are men , women, feminine men and masculine women. As you say we all have a bit of both.

  3. JohnM

    The news today that the Christian Brothers are selling off a school playing field, leaving “their” students with no playing field suggests again that the vision has been lost. The Sisters of Charity trying to leverage their ownership of a site worth a few millions of maybe tens of millions so as to get ownership of a new hospital which will be funded by the taxpayer was another poor example. An excellent example from recent news is of course Fr Sullivan SJ who was a genuine man of God.

  4. Lloyd Allan MacPherson

    Anne @ 2, I live alongside a 10,000+ year old North American Aboriginal culture (The Mi’kmaq) who have used the term “two-spirit” to describe their gender, sexual, and spiritual identity since time immemorial.

  5. Mary Vallely

    The canon to which Mark Patrick Hederman refers is Canon 129 which rules that no lay person can exercise the ” power of governance” in the church. I’m going to quote from Brian Lennon’s (SJ) excellent book, “Can I Stay In the Catholic Church” ( Columba Press 2012) where he mentions Canon 129:-
    “If we change it clericalism will decline and accountability could be improved. If lay people begin to exercise a degree of authority this could open the doors to changes in the role of women in the church.”
    Why can’t we work towards getting this changed??
    I wholeheartedly agree with MPH’s views in this article particularly about the need to open up our minds, hearts and ears to recognise the Holy Spirit in each one of us and to cast aside age old prejudicial notions about gender. I also believe that we have to learn to accept criticism without continually going on the defensive. Criticism and dissension can be positive forces for good. We don’t progress unless we allow their healthy outlet.
    We reflect the love of Christ by learning to live together in harmony and by showing that we respect each other and the planet that we share. The vision of a ‘synodal church’ in which there is ‘free and open debate and consultation’ is surely the model we need to embrace if we want to work towards achieving this harmony?

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