15Sep The reign and ruination of medieval England’s favourite relic

An interesting read from Michael Carter in The Tablet…

Relics of the Holy Blood were (indeed, still are) venerated across Europe. They proliferated in the 12th and 13th centuries, a time of intense, and often highly emotional, devotion to Christ and His sufferings.

https://www.thetablet.co.uk/blogs/1/1588/the-reign-and-ruination-of-medieval-england-s-favourite-relic

2 Responses

  1. Pól Ó Duibhir

    Venerated in Bruges to this very day.

    A blog post on the 1968 Holy Blood procession there.

    https://bezoeken67.blogspot.com/2018/07/holy-blood-procession.html

  2. Eddie Finnegan

    Isn’t it long after time we launched a petition to progress the cause of joint-canonisation of Henry VIII & Anne Boleyn? On second thoughts, those reports of “the deaf had ther heryng aright” might tempt me to reinstate medieval Inglands favourite relic – in Ingland ther were bot few hym lyke.

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